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LOUISIANA STATE UNIVERSITY 
MEDICAL CENTER 

School of Allied Health Professions 



COMMENCEMENT 



Strand Theatre 



1 0:00 A.M., Saturday, August 1 7, 1 996 



The Louisiana State University Medical Center School of Allied 
Health Professions was established by the LSU Board of Supervisors 
April 2, 1970, and became operational July I, 1970, The School now 
incorporates eight academic departments: Cardiopulmonary Science, 
Communication Disorders, Medical Technology, Occupational Therapy, 
Ophthalmic Medical Technology, Physical Therapy, Physician Assistants, 
and Rehabilitation Counseling & Services. 

In addition, the Master of Health Sciences Degree Program integrates 
multidimensional graduate-level curricula in health professions education, 
administration, supervision, and advanced clinical practice. 

The School also includes educational, diagnostic, treatment, and 
service components through the Children's Center in Shreveport, and the 
Human Development Center in New Orleans. 



PROGRAM 

"The audience is requested to remain seated until 
the academic procession is complete" 

PROCESSIONAL 

PRESIDING 

GORDON H. SCHUCKERS, Ph.D., ASSOCIATE DEAN 
School of Allied Health Professions, Shreveport Programs 

NATIONAL ANTHEM 

INVOCATION 

DENNIS R. WISSING, MHS, Program Director 
Department of Cardiopulmonary Science 

WELCOME AND INTRODUCTIONS 

MERVIN L. TRAIL, M.D., CHANCELLOR 
Louisiana State University Medical Center 

JOHN R. SNYDER, Ph.D., DEAN 
School of Allied Health Professions 

ADDRESS 

STANLEY H. ABADIE, Ph.D., DEAN EMERITUS 
School of Allied Health Professions 

PRESENTATION OF CANDIDATES 

JOHN R. SNYDER, Ph.D. 

AWARDING OF DEGREES 

MERVIN L. TRAIL, M.D. 

BENEDICTION 

DENNIS R. WISSING, MHS 

RECESSIONAL 

Jim Williams, organ 



Commencement 
1996 

DR. STANLEY H. ABADIE, DEAN EMERITUS 



Dr. Stanley H. Abadie, Dean Emeritus of the LSU Medical Center, School 
of Allied Health Professions, received his Bachelor of Science Degree in 
Biology from Loyola University in 1 955. He continued his graduate studies at 
Louisiana State University, where he was awarded his Master's Degree in 
Medical Parasitology in 1958 and his Ph.D. in 1963. Dr. Abadie's distin- 
guished career at the LSU Medical Center spans over four decades. He 
started as a graduate assistant in 1 956 and rose through the academic 
ranks, earning the title of Professor of Medical Parasitology and Microbiology 
in 1972. His administrative contributions to the LSU School of Medicine in 
New Orleans are extensive. He served as Acting Head of the Department of 
Tropical Medicine and Medical Parasitology and Assistant Dean for Curricu- 
lar Affairs. Dr. Abadie is also highly respected as a teacher and researcher. 
One of his major research contributions involved development of the first 
heartworm serum for dogs. 

In August 1 975, Dr. Abadie was appointed Dean of the LSU Medical 
Center, School of Allied Health Professions. He is recognized nationally and 
internationally as a leading spokesman and statesman for the allied health 
professions. As a charter member of the Southern Association of Allied Health 
Deans at Academic Health Centers, he was a major force in structuring the 
organization into one of the nation's most dynamic professional organiza- 
tions. During this same time period, Dr. Abadie oversaw the design and 
construction of the Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton Rouge, 
and served as its interim director. 

Dr. Abadie's contributions to higher education and health care in Loui- 
siana are unparalleled. During his 1 9 year tenure as dean, his leadership 
in the development of academic and programmatic excellence has 
elevated the LSU School of Allied Health Professions to one of the most out- 
standing programs in the nation. From a set of barracks on Florida Avenue, 
to a downtown motel, to a state-of-the-art building in the Medical Center 
complex, Dr. Abadie developed a strong, vibrant educational institution. In 
1 975, the School of Allied Health Professions had 65 students enrolled in two 
programs. In 1 977, the first two programs were opened in Shreveport with 
an enrollment of 1 3. From these meager beginnings the combined cam- 
puses of New Orleans and Shreveport now enroll a total of 593 students 
in 1 3 academic programs within eight departments. The 1 996 graduating 
class of 227 students represent Dr. Abadie's paramount achievement and 
a remarkable legacy to the future Louisiana. 



THE GRADUATES - BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 



CARDIOPULMONARY SCIENCE 

Angela Christine Wise Bridges 
Brady Lee Gardner 
Travis Wayne Houston 
Shonda Knox Lewter 
Gregory Martin Mallett 
Mark Stephen Miller 
Tammy Michelle Moses 
Kala Lynn Newton 
Melissa C. Shorb 

MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 

Roxie Giles Bell 
Virginia Elizabeth Booth 
Patricia A. Bouillon 
*Kimberley Field-Worsham 
Traci L. Fontenot 
Wendy Lynn Fulco 
Lawrence Vincent Kaltz, Jr. 
Stephanie Griffin Mason 
Brenda Sue Shockley 

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY 

Laura Kirsten Chopin 
Celeste Rene Evans 
Mark Kirby Gleason 
Kelaine Michelle Holland 
Melanie Denise King 
Kelly Kristine Knight 
** Suzanne Bonnette Lorio 
Alicia D. Martello 
Naomi Hargrove Morelock 
***Victoria Lynn Nightingale 
Bobby Dewain Procell 
Amanda Morgan Rowell 
Sarah Elizabeth Shirley 
Katherine Brooke Slack 
Kristi Jenell Smith 
Juli Vardeman Tauzin 
Tammy Crump Thompson 
Kathryn McLemore Wilson 

PHYSICAL THERAPY 

Jana Wallace Brooks 
Michelle Renee Bulliard 
** Michael Shane Castille 
*** Rebecca Lynne Cross 
Casey Glasgow Davis 
Kirk Michael Ellis 
Kelly Slack Garland 
Jimmy Wayne Harris, Jr. 
*Anne B. Huesmann 



MARSHALS 



** Shannon Cary Johnson 

Mark James Kinnard 

Shannon Joseph Lemoine 

James Curtis Lyons, Jr. 

Stanley Keith McCallon 

Millie Anderson Moore 
*** Noelle Gerise Moreau 

Diana Elizabeth Russell 

Emily Carol Ryan 
** Mark Richard Siegel 

Kevin Thomas Sowell 

Kellye Arden Trant 

Donna Turbeville 

Stephen Robert VanHook 
**Sara Kay Wriborg 

PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT 

James K. Adams 
* Michelle Lea Akin 
Kenneth W. Betzing 
Rodney Fletcher Branch 
Eric John Buller 
Sherry Grace Bush 
Aaron Dean Chauvin 
Bradley Paul Chauvin 
Padma Lata Chintapalli 
Douglas Joe Estey 
Brady Kirk Guillory 
Stephen A. Guillory, II 
Gerard Majella Gulllot, III 
James Garrett LeBlanc 
Jennifer L. Malhotra 
Major J. Mittendorf 
Letatia Renee Norris 
Pamela Davis Rasch 
Robin Poe Schichner 

MASTER OF COMMUNICATION 
DISORDERS 

Eileen Haynes Collins 
Gina Nicole Easterly 
Kathryn Bradley Flurry 
Angela Lemons Horst 
Stephanie Ann Martin 
Lora Virginia Moser 
Christi Rene Ratcliff 
Toyia Digilormo Urbaniak 

MASTER OF HEALTH SCIENCES 

Sharon D. Jones 
Kathleen Aycock Loper 



Richard Whitehead, BS, RRT • John S. Davis, MBA, MT(ASCP)SC, DLM 
Kristin Seidner, MSW, LOTR • Joseph McCulloch, Ph.D. • Valgene Valgora, PA-C, MS.Ed 

Mary Pannbacker, Ph.D. 

k indicates Summa Cum Laude, ** indicates Magna Cum Laude, * indicates Cum Laude 



ACADEMIC HERALDRY: THE SYMBOLS OF LEARNING 

The college or university commencement procession, in the United States 
and abroad, is a pageant, alive and bright with dress and ceremony. Its 
history can be traced to medieval European universities of the eleventh and 
twelfth centuries. Continued recognition of the need to preserve scholarly 
dignity and meaning resulted in universities establishment for academic dress. 
American universities agreed on a standard system in 1 895 and designed a 
suitable code for academic dress for the colleges and universities of the United 
States. In 1 932, the American Council on Education presented a revised 
code which governs the style of academic dress today. 

The principal features of academic dress are three: the gown, 
the cap, and the hood. 

The Gown. The flowing gown originated during the twelfth century. It has 
become symbolic of the democracy of scholarship. As such, it completely 
covers any dress of rank or social standing. It is black for all degrees, with 
pointed sleeves for the Bachelor's degree; long, closed sleeves for the Master's 
degree; and round open sleeves for the Doctor's degree. The gown worn for 
the Bachelor's or Master's degree has no trimmings. The gown for the Doctor's 
degree is faced down the front with velvet and has three bars of velvet across 
the sleeves, in the color distinctive of the faculty or discipline to which the 
degree pertains. For certain institutions the official colors of the 
college or university may appear on the gown or its decorations. 

The Cap. The freed slave in Ancient Rome won the privilege of wearing a 
cap. Thus, the academic cap is a symbol denoting the freedom of scholar- 
ship and the responsibility and dignity with which the wearer is endowed. Old 
poetry records the cap of scholarship as a square to symbolize the book. Other 
authorities claim that the cap, or "mortar board" is a symbol of the masons, a 
privileged guild. The color of the tassel denotes the discipline, although a gold 
tassel may be worn with a doctoral gown. 

The Hood. The heraldic design of the hood symbolizes an inverted shield 
with one or more secondary color chevrons on the background color of the 
college or university. The color of the facing of the hood denotes the discipline 
represented by the degree, and the color of the lining designates the college 
or university from which the degree was granted. 



COLORS DISTINCTIVE OF DISCIPLINES AND PROFESSIONS 

Dark Blue: Philosophy Green: Medicine 

Yellow: Science Lilac: Dentistry 

Light Blue: Education Apricot: Nursing 



NATIONAL ANTHEM 

Oh, say can you see, by the down's eorly light 

What so proudly we holled ot the twilights lost gleoming. 

Whose brood stripes ond bright stors through the perilous flight 

Oer the romports we watched were so gallantly streaming? 

And the rockets red glare, the bomb bursting in air, 

Gave proof through the night that our flag was still there. 

Oh, say, does that star-spangled banner yet wave 

Oer the land of the free and the home of the brave? 

Francis Scott Key